Home Economy Growth is the Word

Growth is the Word

888
0

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”]

Angela Merkel - World Economic Forum Annual Me...
Angela Merkel – World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2011 (Photo credit: World Economic Forum)

Much of the reporting from the World Economic Forum at Davos this year seems to have an optimistic hue to it – not all sunshine and flowers, but also not much doom or gloom. The usual suspects are in place as is the rhetoric – captains of industry sharing fine wines with the heads of nations, talking about the need ‘for growth.’ This last point seemed to be the refrain from many, including the Queen of Austerity, Germany’s Angela Merkel. Her address this year was predictable, but also helpful in bringing comments from attendees like the Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, calling for the focus to shift to better achieving growth, and an end to moaning about cost cutting.

It is often said that verbalizing intent is the crucial first step to taking action. “I can be extremely frustrated that the debates in the eurozone group are so much focused on the troubles we have. We should move to spend time on getting growth going,” Mr Rutte said, adding “We need countries like Denmark, Sweden and the UK… to stay not just in the EU but to be active, because they are focused on bolstering [/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][their economies] and that is a very different debate we are having in the eurozone.” Merkel agreed with this sentiment, but Rutte is right – 2013 should be the year that the EU and eurozone come together to implement creative ideas towards economic stimulus. 

Austerity is recognized and in place for many nations (whether it’s working effectively is another issue), but what is needed now is greater job creation, greater competitiveness and creative ideas for greater growth. This last point is the tricky bit, but the potential is there if Europe doesn’t get mired in useless bureaucracy and bickering – politics need to be about positive action in the next twelve months, and then the recovery will begin.

Enhanced by Zemanta

[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

 
SHARE
Previous articleWouldn’t Bet On It
Next articleStandard & Poor is in the Doghouse
William R. Feins , freelance journalist from London, UK; he received his B.A. degree in Economics and his Masters in Sociology. William has always been interested in the mechanics of business and the inspiration of original thinkers, and firmly believes that the former can’t succeed without the latter. In his spare time, he enjoys the ridiculous spectacle of watching table tennis on a big screen (preferably at a pub) and reading weighty tomes about World War II.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

*